Day 19. In between jails : a free association of words #sol19 #solsc

slice-of-life_individual

March 19th

Yesterday, I went to a meeting in Sevilla. On my way back I decided to check a spot I read it used to be a jail until the XIX century. Miguel de Cervantes was in prison there between September and December of 1597. And of course, Sevilla claims that his stay in there was the beginning of “El Quijote“. The jail was in the intersection of Sierpes (main pedestrian street downtown Sevilla) and a small street called Entre cárceles [In between jails]. I don’t know why that name struck me. I imagined myself walking along the busy street of XVI century Sevilla, and telling people I live between two jails: La Cárcel Real de Sevilla and La Real Audiencia. It was 7:30 pm when I was imagining this. The hustling and bustling of the city helped my day dreaming. Buildings are now just tourist shops selling us the past . There’s even a little monument that commemorate Cervantes’ stay at the Cárcel Real de Sevilla. Like he went to an Airbnb for a couple of nights. Ironically, now the building is a bank, the 21st century people’s jail.

By 1597, Cervantes was a tax collector and he gave us the honor of staying at this prison since one of his helpers committed a mistake, and appeared like Cervantes was keeping some of the money for himself. A little vendetta, perhaps?

Today I went biking to my chiropractor and on the way back I found a graffiti with the word “word“. It made me think of Cervantes again, and writers. It seems that in idle times is when you’re more productive. Or maybe when you’re in between jails?

On that same ride I listened to the short YA novel “Long way down” by Jason Reynolds. It was read by the author which made it more powerful. Listening to his comments at the end of the book made me think about injustice, and how many times the wrong people are in detention centers.

Our son started sending us messages complaining that he needed to pay 1,000 dollars in taxes on 237 dollars of taxable income. Something doesn’t square up. He worked the summer to pay for college. Maybe like Cervantes, his assistant, the who knows what software, is committing a mistake, we hope.

Finally, I was trapped in the car for 5 hours since we went to pick up our niece from Montana who is visiting for Spring break. Just like Jason Reynold’s story, —much more superficial though—, it was a long way down to go to Málaga and back to Sevilla.

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Entre Carceles and Sierpes Streets
Cervantes’ monument on Entrecárceles street in front of the jail
Graffiti next to the Guadalquivir river
Now there’s a bar where the police guards stayed at the prison
The former Real Cárcel de Sevilla

8 thoughts on “Day 19. In between jails : a free association of words #sol19 #solsc

  1. This is so cool! I love how you weave in photos along with your words. “It seems that in idle times is when you’re more productive. Or maybe when you’re between jails?”- this really stuck out to me….I think that writers can relate to this idea and I had never thought of it like this before.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You have such a way of playing with an idea – you start with the jail (Cervantes – what a claim to fame for Sevilla) and move on to injustice to your son’s taxes to being trapped in your car for 5 hours. And somehow you tie that all together – so cool.

    Like

  3. I enjoyed your musings as you walk and bike about your city. There are many images that stick with me- the street Entre Carceles, the graffiti ‘word ‘, bank as jail, an on. Meandering but provocative.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Brian. “Chain of associations”, that’s what I meant 🙂 About my son’s books, we hope so too. You have to give him credit for doing his taxes on Spring break!

      Like

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