Day 29. Spanglish brain #sol19 #SOLSC

slice-of-life_individualMarch 29th

I can’t believe there are only three days left for the Slice of Life Story Challenge. I might have a postpartum depression. In April I will continue the challenge in Spanish. I feel I have abandoned my native language during this month. I have written very sloppy stories for my writing workshop. It seems as my neurons can’t switch so fast. Sometimes it’ s hard in both languages. Random sloppiness, sloppy randomness, Spanglish brain. There are some Chilean words in Spanish that I can’t express in English and viceversa


 

Regalona. I will never find a word like this in any other  Spanish country or in the English language. It’s being spoiled, mimada, but in a positive way. It’s a person who loves to cuddle, to give and receive kisses, it’s being spoiled, and loved all at the same time.

Upset. The brevity  of this word compared with the intense feelings that express has always amazed me.

Gorgeous. I heard this word for the first time when I arrived in the US. I find it so cacophonous. I have mix-feeling when I use it. In fact, I don’t think I can use it. Only in writing.

Awesome. This word has been overused but I think is just because combines so many things at the same time that other words can’t convey.

Guatona. Literally this is having a big belly but in my family is an expression of deep affection that I can’t express in other ways. It’s a family secret code.

Chanchada. When you eat something really good but you know you are sinning. This happen a lot in my family.

Pan con palta. Wait. Bread with avocado, avocado toast. Nope. Nothing compares to a pan con palta. It evokes my childhood, my children’s childhood, the very essence of health, simplicity, and feeling lucky for being able to afford it.

Hot-dog. An American hot-dog is expensive, aseptic, dry and boring. A Chilean hot-dog or Completo is juicy, full of colors and very cheap. Maybe Cotsco hot–dogs are the exemption to the rule.

McCannudos. Our chat, our family last name can be awesome in Spanish.

Excruciating. It has some onomatopoeic sounds. It’s like the sound of being crucified.

Quinn or Queen? I never knew the difference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Day 29. Spanglish brain #sol19 #SOLSC

  1. I figure the bi- or multi-lingual brain must confer more upsides than drawbacks, and my theory is confirmed by your delightful approach to linguistic intricacies in today’s slice. Thanks for persevering through a month of writing in English! I, for one, am humbled by your capacities for language.

    Liked by 1 person

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